“Who do you say I am?”

So, somehow I am supposed to be able to write these reflections in the midst of the most incomprehensible and amazing summer of my life. This summer has been one of new experiences, new ideas, first times, and new friends. I gave my first morning watches in North Carolina, as well as gave my first attempt at the Cross Fit workouts (thanks Cory), and I watched some of the funniest YouTube videos I’ve even seen in Oklahoma. I even attempted my first labyrinth as a worship station last week at Central Christian Camp in Oklahoma. Let me just say, those are a lot easier in theory. It took me two hours in the sun, I was late for dinner, and after inhaling way too much spray paint, I stood drenched in my sweat to realize I hadn’t done it completely right (which actually worked out for the best). On top of that, I have welcomed in and been welcomed in by some the most wonderful people in the world and have had experiences that have completely changed who I am…and I’m not even halfway through the summer…

In North Carolina the week’s theme was “Facing your Demons,” which was a focus on all of our live’s burdens and how we confront those to live more fully with God. In Oklahoma it was “Get Real” and looking at who Jesus was and still is, while attempting to understand what Jesus means in our lives. The question raised last week in Oklahoma on the first day was “Who do you say I am,” which Jesus asked his disciples in Matthew 16:13. This was the question that set the tone of the week and led into looking at who is Jesus and the various names for him – Jesus as Friend, Jesus as Teacher, Jesus as Healer, Jesus as Savior. In reflecting on this, it seems that the better question to ask yourself is, “Who does Jesus say I am?”

This question stands out to me and I think rephrasing it may help us better understand our responsibility to the world. We have the tendency to get caught up in all the amazing things Jesus did for us, but what are we doing in return? How are we living in the example he set for us? It is really easy to understand that Jesus was a friend, a healer, and our savior. Now my question to myself and to you is: How are we being friends, teachers, and healers? How are we living in the example of Jesus and being the body of Christ? We still live in this world and one that is very, very messy. As Christians we are called to be the body of Christ so why, then, are we avoiding the messes of the world?

The thing is, this concept, like the labyrinth is very simple in theory, but there is always something burdening us, holding us back, or standing in our way. So what I have concluded is that in order for us to live out the example of Jesus, we might want to recognize the issues that keep us from doing that. For many of us, we have our personal barriers. At the same time, if we are going to make a difference in the world, we may want unmask our society’s problems instead of trying to hide them because its easy. Just remember, as the campers in North Carolina pointed out, you are all worthy of love and belonging and it is okay to allow yourself to be vulnerable with God, or with the world – no matter how difficult that is to do. Jesus didn’t choose easy; rather, he jumped head first into the mess and now, as the body of Christ, it is our turn to jump.

There is no doubt in my mind that the hope for our future is bright. I’ve seen it everyday the last three weeks in all the people I have encountered and it is often times in the smallest of gestures. Like when a camper reaches out to someone completely different than themselves, to an outsider, and pulls them into the dance circle to make them feel welcomed and loved. Then there was the time when a camper questioned the camp for not recycling. Or, I saw it even more clearly last week when the camp in Oklahoma packaged 57,000 meals for Kids Against Hunger, and many of the campers gave up two days of their swim time to do it. Of course, it is easy to do this at camp, but I fully believe these kids are ready to take the peace and acceptance they find at camp to everyone they meet. They understand that they have a responsibility to do more than celebrate our salvation, but to be arms and legs of Jesus – to be the teachers, the friends, and the healers. They also know that it is going to be hard and that there are always obstacles.

Now, the challenge is on us, so ask yourself, who does Jesus I am?

-Daniel

 

This entry was posted in Follow the Interns. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

7 Comments

  1. Lynn Lyvers
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    So proud of you Daniel! You are an amazing young man!

  2. Dorsey
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 7:05 pm | Permalink

    Great job Daniel. Hope Jesus says I am a good and faithful servant ! I will continue to work on it! Keep up the good work and enjoy Camp WaKon Da Ho this week .

  3. Carol Simpson
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 9:01 pm | Permalink

    You are an amazing and loving young man who I have watched grow from birth. Very proud of all you have done so far with your life and wishing God’s continued blessings in all you do.

  4. Israel
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 11:22 pm | Permalink

    We were blessed to have to you in Oklahoma with us last week. I think your influence at camp made our campers stop and think about what is happening outside of their tiny world, and enouraged them to think beyond Oklahoma. Thanks for answering their questions and for giving them more questions to ask in their lives.

  5. Israel
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 11:22 pm | Permalink

    We were blessed to have to you in Oklahoma with us last week. I think your influence at camp made our campers stop and think about what is happening outside of their tiny world, and enouraged them to think beyond Oklahoma. Thanks for answering their questions and for giving them more questions to ask in their lives.

  6. Randy Kuss
    Posted July 2, 2014 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

    Great to glimpse who you are becoming on this journey, Daniel. Thanks.

    On the labyrinth, using the guide you have, practice drawing it on paper a number of times to get a better feel for how it all comes together. One 6-pack of Marking paint or of Striping paint (not regular spray paint cans) will easily do the 7-circuit classical labyrinth design AND the nozzle design is easier to use for this than those on regular spray paint cans. Of course, if you have access to a Marking Wand ($25-$30 at Lowe’s – for use w/ duh Marking paint) or a Striping Machine ($125 – for use w/ Striping paint) then the job is easier, specially on the back! Marking Wand is easier and cheaper than Striping Machine. Just be sure to get the right paint for whichever you might use. Hope that helps w/ your next one.

  7. Andy Beck
    Posted July 7, 2014 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    Wonderful reflections, Daniel. Thank you for your willingness to share and serve with us Okies this summer. May the rest of your summer be filled with joy!

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*
*